6 Different Types of Modaks You Can Try For Ganesh Chaturthi

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Come August. The festive season kick starts. During the Ashada month, people get together at temples or across spiritual places. Hence, marriages or functions are not celebrated throughout the Aashada month of the Indian calendar. Post Aashada, functions start appearing one by one. You have Raksha Bhandhan, Janmastami, Ganesh Chathurthi, Navratri, Guru Purnima and a whole lot of them. A veganized form of living ensures compassion between living beings and we share our respect to animals or earthlings we share our planet with. That is primarily the reason why we vegans aim to celebrate festivals without using meat, eggs, dairy and milk. This way, we aim ensuring, you celebrate cruelty free. 


Let us discover how 6 different forms of modaks can be veganized for Ganesh Chathurthi!


Steamed Modaks- Sweetened version


This is the most traditional variety of modaks that are prepared at homes for the occasion of Ganesh Chathurthi. You pressure cook rice flour. Post which, you start preparing the base for the modaks one by one. Inside the modak, there is a sumptuous stuffing of grated coconut and jaggery. Although it takes time to prepare, you steam them once the stuffing is done. You can use vegan ghee or vanaspati instead of dairy ghee!


Salted modaks


Here, you have yet another traditional variety of modaks that are steamed using rice-flour as the base. Here, the dumpling you stuff inside the modak is a salted one. You prepare the dumpling from pressure-cooked and mashed urad dal. Ginger and green chillies are added inside the dumpling too for that added taste or flavor. 


You make the base into a boat shaped one, stuff the dumplings inside. Once you prepare about 10-12 of them, you can place them on a steaming plate and out comes spicy hot modaks for you to indulge in. You can smear the steam plates using vegan butter or ghee instead of the dairy-version!


Til based modaks


Again this is a third variety of modak that is prepared at traditional families in South and North India. You pressure cook rice flour and then prepare the base for the modaks to be done. The dumpling is done by grinding til or sesame seeds into the mixer jar. The powder is then mixed with jaggery inside the tava. This is the dumpling stuffed into the modaks. Again, you may make a boat-shaped modak, stuff the dumpling inside and then seal the modak. Once you prepare around 10-12 of them, you can steam them. And, then repeat the process for the 2nd set of modaks, you aim to prepare.


Deep-fried modaks


This is a different variety of modak all together. Deep fried modaks are popular across homes in Mumbai or across households in Maharashtra. Here, you make the flour from maida or wheat-flour. The dumpling can be made from a mix of jaggery and grated coconut as we had seen for the first version of sweetened modaks. You make small open bowls and stuff the dumpling inside. Once 5-6 of them, you deep fry them in hot oil. Also named sugiyans, this variety of modaks are becoming popular at South Indian homes too. 


Dry fruit modaks


You can soak dry fruits like almonds, cashews, pistachios, raisins and khus khus seeds. Grind the dry fruits inside a mixer-jar or blender. Now, prepare the base from wheat flour or maida flour. Start making open bowls into which you can start filling the dry fruit dumplings one by one. You can deep fry them.


If you have modak-making molds at home, you can also press the dry fruit dumpling into each of the molds. You can grease vanaspati or vegan butter before you carry out the process. This is like a raw or uncooked variety of modak. 


Chocolate modaks


To give an Indo-western tinge to the art of making sweets, here we come up with yet another variation of modaks. The outer base takes the form of glazed chocolate and glucose biscuits while into the insides lie luscious melted chocolate. 


Instead of melted chocolate, you can also add dry fruits or coconut grating with the outer base made from raw organic cocoa powder and powdered biscuits. Use veganized cashew or almond cream for the melted chocolate dumpling for the extra rich and creamy texture. 


Conclusion


I have made an attempt to veganize every variant of modak for which you would use ghee, melted butter or cream. Log on to https://www.vvegano.com, your very own plant-based store. You get an endless variety of nut butters, vegan ghee and dairy free products to make your festive occasion 100% guilt-free or cruelty-free. Ganapati Papa Mourya!!!