Explore Soy foods Vs Their Myths

Image Courtesy - www.freepik.com

 

Although we have quite a lot of plant foods that provide ample amounts of vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and other micronutrients the body typically needs, there are some myths surrounding certain varieties of plant-based staples. Soy products remain the king of controversy when it comes to myths concerned with the same. In this segment, we are going to debunk the top three myths that are connected with the consumption of soy products. Let us get started with the same:

 

Myth # 1: Soy products lead to breast cancer

Many people feel that consuming soy milk on a daily basis can increase the chances of  breast cancer. This is mainly because soy products are rich in isoflavones. Isoflavones are phytoestrogens as a matter of fact. In other words, phytoestrogens relate to plant-based estrogens. When the body reproduces too much estrogen, the condition, accentuates the formation of breast cancer in women. This is a myth that is far away from the truth. 

 

Phytoestrogens act like estrogens but they do not overproduce this particular hormone in the body. In fact, there is a corollary truth attached to it. As Phytoestrogens mimic the actual estrogens, these contain anti-estrogen properties. Hence, phytoestrogens provide a wall in the body that prevents the growth or reproduction of natural estrogen. This way, the estrogen formation in the body can be stopped altogether. Again, clinically or even medically, there is no evidence that people who drink soy milk or consume soy products on a regular basis, fall under the danger zone of contracting Breast Cancer. 

 

Myth # 2- Soy Products can make men more feminine

Soy products make males feminine. This is a myth that is again baseless as a matter of fact. The myth stems from the fact that, the experiments amongst rodents showed impaired ability in male rats to bear off spring, as they were given soy products rich in phytoestrogen. However, the same experiment need not hold true for human beings. Hence the myth concluded that soy products which are highly rich in isoflavones reduce the levels of testosterone levels in men. In other words, this can impact the masculine factor men have. Isoflavones do not hinder the production of testosterone levels in men as there is no clinical studies that have evidence on the aforestated myth. In other words, isoflavones does not have a direct impact to hinder the production of free testosternone or estrogen levels in men. 

 

Myth # 3- Is Soy meat always more nutritious than real meat?

Soy products are plant-based proteins that are rich in varied forms of micro and macro nutrients for the body to function in an optimal manner. Soy products are rich in different forms of amino acids make them a protein packed meal. Hence, hoteliers promote soy products to replace different kinds of meaty products. These include soy burgers, soy nuggets, vegan hot dogs.

 

On the contrary, just imagine how meats are being prepared? In order to churn out a meaty dish, hoteliers or food processing agents add so much of additives or preservatives to add to the shelf life of the product. Plus, the foods are going to be deep-fried too. So, here, whether you consume meat in its original form, or it its super-processed plant-based form, the body is not going to derive any form of health benefits. Clogging of arteries due to cholesterol build up, either ways is inevitable.

 

Plant-based food is healthier when you mildly stir fry, steam or blanch the veggies. Again saturated soy-based isoflavones can impact your liver or kidney in the longer run. Even if you want to consume a range of soy products, it is better you consume them in their minimally processed form. You can consume tempeh, tofu, edamame, or, even soy-nuts to derive most of the benefits from this nutrient dense ingredient.

 

Conclusion

The major myths connected with consumption of soy or its products have been discussed with you at length. If you have other myths Vs their busted facts, place them under the Comment’s Section. 

 

Info taken from:- 3 Soy Myths Debunked | Nutrition (arizona.edu)